The 3 Step Tying process for the  Rattle Bucktail

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The 3 Step Tying process for the Rattle Bucktail

Recently Greg posted a short video on Facebook about how the Rattle Bucktail is constructed using a 3 step process. I’d like to share the details of that process with photos displaying each step.

There are some toothy critters in the water where you like to fish our bucktails, and they can destroy a poorly created lure in a very short time. We decided to use a process when we created the Rattle Bucktail that would help it to withstand those razor teeth on fish such as the bluefish. We also wanted to have the bucktail generate lots of movement in the water and project a certain profile. For those reasons we disregarded the lengthier time it takes to tie the bucktail with the goal of it being a unique lure that catches fish under the worse circumstances.

Before we even put one wrap of thread on the rattle bucktail, it is fitted with Greg Myerson’s custom rattle. It is this rattle that allows him to be so successful on the water. He holds the world record for catching the largest Striped Bass at 81.14 pounds and three other IGFA world record titles for Striped Bass. It also has resulted in Greg winning On The Waters StriperFest, Angler of the Year and Largest Striper Caught three years in a row. Joe Diorio took over when Greg stopped competing, and he has won the Angler of the year title in 2014 and 2015 for the Catch and Release category. Joe was using one of  Greg’s Rattling Products to win those tournaments. Basically, Greg Myerson and His World Record Striper Company Rattling Products have dominated one of the largest tournaments on the East Coast for over five years.

Step One:

 

The first coat of thread covers the body of the rattle to give the bucktail a better surface to grab on to. It is also coated with cement to insure the integrity of the wraps.

World Record Striper The 3 Step Tying process for the  Rattle Bucktail

Step Two:

World Record Striper The 3 Step Tying process for the  Rattle Bucktail

World Record Striper The 3 Step Tying process for the  Rattle Bucktail

Often, tying on bucktails using big bunches all at once, ends up creating a situation where the thread is just touching the top of the bucktail and not the hairs below. In that situation if a few hairs pull out from under the bunch of hair; eventually, all the hair will loosen and come apart. We use multiple smaller bunches to prevent that from happening. We also cover the wraps with cement which sinks into the bucktail below to insure it can’t pull out. The hair is secured with very tight turns of Danville Flymaster + waxed thread (above right) to insure the security of the hair. This first bunch is approximately 3.5 inches in length. There is also multiple strands of flash tied in at this point to give the bucktail a little sparkle in the water.


Step Three:

World Record Striper The 3 Step Tying process for the  Rattle Bucktail

The third stage consists of tying on the front bunches of bucktail (above). They are secured the same way as the first bunches to insure a strong attachment to the shank. This hair is approximately 3” long which gives the  Rattle Bucktail its unique taper. We apply three coats of Loon Hard as Hull cement over the final wraps. Having this second bunch of bucktail also helps to protect the wraps holding the first bunches of bucktail from the fish’s teeth (Below).

World Record Striper The 3 Step Tying process for the  Rattle Bucktail

As you can see from our tying methods long life is assured and lots of motion with a fishy appearance is the end result. If you haven’t tried one of these bucktails yet, you’re allowing a lot of fish to just swim on by.

Good Fishing,

Rob

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